The Dream House

The Dream House A farmhouse is being reproduced a dozen times with slight variations throughout a valley Three small graves have been dug in the front garden the middle one lying empty A woman in a wheelchair sort

  • Title: The Dream House
  • Author: Craig Higginson
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 498
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • A farmhouse is being reproduced a dozen times, with slight variations, throughout a valley Three small graves have been dug in the front garden, the middle one lying empty A woman in a wheelchair sorts through boxes while her husband clambers around the old demolished buildings, wondering where the animals have gone A young woman called the barren one behind her bacA farmhouse is being reproduced a dozen times, with slight variations, throughout a valley Three small graves have been dug in the front garden, the middle one lying empty A woman in a wheelchair sorts through boxes while her husband clambers around the old demolished buildings, wondering where the animals have gone A young woman called the barren one behind her back dreams of love, while an ageing headmaster contemplates the end of his life At the entrance to the long dirt driveway, a car appears and pauses pointed towards the house like a silver bullet, ticking with heat.So begins The Dream House, Craig Higginson s riveting and unforgettable novel set in the Midlands of KwaZulu Natal Written with dark wit, a stark poetic style and extraordinary tenderness, this is a story about the state of a nation and a deep meditation on memory, ageing, meaning, family, love and loss The Dream House is written with such a fierce and steady compassion that the reader can only come away from it transformed ready to take on the challenges of living with a renewed heart and a bigger vision.

    • Best Download [Craig Higginson] ↠ The Dream House || [Business Book] PDF ↠
      498 Craig Higginson
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      Posted by:Craig Higginson
      Published :2019-03-26T02:33:14+00:00

    About "Craig Higginson"

    1. Craig Higginson

      Craig Higginson is an internationally acclaimed writer who lives in Johannesburg His plays have been performed and produced at the National Theatre London , the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Trafalgar Studios on London s West End , the Traverse Theatre Edinburgh , the Stadsteater Stockholm , Salisbury Theatre, the Citizens Theatre Glasgow , Live Theatre Newcastle , Next Theatre Chicago , Theatre 503 and the Finborough Theatre both London , the Market Theatre Johannesburg and several other theatres and festivals around the world Craig s plays include Laughter in the Dark, Lord of the Flies, Truth in Translation co writer , Dream of the Dog, Ten Bush co writer , The Jungle Book, The Girl in the Yellow Dress, Little Foot and The Imagined Land Novels include The Hill, Last Summer and The Landscape Painter and The Dream House His writing has won several awards in the UK and South Africa.

    575 thoughts on “The Dream House”

    1. The awful truth about the way one race treats another as less than human is the air this book breathes. Within this world, Higginson is brilliant at portraying with sustained intensity the pains and passions, numbness and sparks of life of all his characters as they play out endings. Ending of the white family's life on the KwaZulu Natal farm, ending of layers of lies about affairs and rape and death, ending of black silence, lots of ending of hope and just the faintest glimmerings of new hope.T [...]


    2. Feel that this author entirely missed the psyche of white south africa while at the same time succeeded in undermining the capacity to think critically (overall intelligence) of black south africa. It was a book evidently written by a white south african who probably thinks he nailed it.



    3. A farm in the KZN Midlands. Graves, secrets, tragedies. Atmospheric setting – we feel the clammy mist enveloping us, hear the drip of moisture; there is a smell of damp dog and the insides of cupboards where nothing is ever 100% dry.And now the farm is sold to developers, and elderly Patricia and Richard will relocate to Durban, together with Beauty and Bheki, but before they go, someone from the past comes calling, stirring up memories.We know this place and these characters. The main charact [...]


    4. Tragically told, exceptionally written. If I were to emulate any writer, it would be Craig Higginson. This book fell into my lap while vacationing in South Africa, and I could not put it down. Higginson has a way of describing the most perfunctory feelings in crystal clear prose, bringing you into contact with the characters at an unprecedented level of intimacy. Looking forward to reading his other novels.


    5. One day, some time in the future, an academic will study South African post-apartheid white literature and will no doubt offer a psycho-historical explanation for why all of it is so bleak. Or maybe I'm the one who is bleak and these novels are just a Rorschach blot in which I see my own despair. Whatever it is, I found this book to follow the same formula as all the others: a black victim, an ignorant white, an unspoken secret and some messed up sexual thing. Ugh.


    6. An elderly couple are packing up, leaving their farm in the Midlands where they had spent most of their adult lives, and moving to Durban where they will see out the end of their days. Patricia has to make the decisions because her husband, Richard, suffers from senile dementia and needs constant supervision. He does very strange things; once he was found naked inside a disused porcupine hole. Their marriage had been disastrous; even in his prime he was ineffectual yet imbued with that peculiar [...]


    7. This book takes place in post-Apartheid South Africa, set in the Midlands in KwaZulu Natal. Higginson's writing is poignant and often beautiful. The chapters are unusually short, and each chapter progresses the narrative through one of the key protagonists. I enjoyed Higginson's technique of advancing the story by telling it through these different characters. The story is engaging and moving - sometimes I found it too "politically correct" and a little stereotyped in its version of the racial d [...]


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